Answering FAQ About Sustainable Fashion… From Someone Who Doesn’t Buy Fast Fashion

Hello! Ever since boycotting fast fashion I have heard the same questions over and over. Today’s post is an effort to clear up any of your questions and it will hopefully be educational! I asked you over on Instagram to submit these questions. So if you want to be involved in the next post like this, please follow me over there. Ugh I actually hate promoting my Instagram – it feels like such a cliche. Anyway, on to the important stuff:

What about trends?

Trends are the food that fast fashion feeds from. The trends that are going around now seem to be recycled bits of old fashion, meaning the charity shop is the place to find all of the hidden gems. Buying into trends is a waste of money anyway, because they will disappear as soon as they came into fashion. Buy things that you know will last a long time, or won’t go out of style any time soon.

How do you get socks/underwear?

This is one thing I have to source from fast fashion brands, but rather than support the big high street retailers I pop into Peacocks or M&S.

What if someone gifts you fast fashion?

Of course, by refusing it you are contributing more waste to the world. If you can, try sending it back. If it is a close family member/friend explain why you don’t buy fast fashion. Exclaim that you love the thought behind it but you would prefer something else next time. Be gentle, but don’t stay silent.

Are you ‘uncool’ at school for only having second hand pieces?

I honestly don’t know. I haven’t been into school since March, and it was during lockdown that I researched the horrors of fast fashion. I never bought many clothes before hand, and that was never regarded as ‘uncool’. I did feel a bit stupid wearing the same jumper on every school trip but no-one seemed to mind, If they did, they didn’t voice their opinion. It’s not uncool to save the planet.

Will you ever buy fast fashion?

Sadly, in the last few days, I’ve had to purchase some school uniform. I’m moving schools so it requires a whole new set of clothes! It is unfortunate that I have to buy from fast fashion brands in this instance, but it’s the only time of the year that I do so. I will research how my school uniform is made, that could be an interesting topic of research.

If you don’t buy from garment workers, how do they get paid?

There are a few charities I have discovered that help garment workers and their families obtain necessary goods for living – such as food, water and safe housing. You can give a bit of money towards them, or support larger charities in the country of concern who will give help not only to garment workers but a broader reach of workers. Buying second hand is cheaper than fast fashion in many cases, so with the extra dosh you’ve saved you can donate towards a charity you believe in.

Have you ever bought from a sustainable brand?

Never! I find they are way out of my reach in terms of cost. I just visit the charity shop if I need anything (that’s a British equivalent to a thrift store, except money spent goes to NGO charities)

Do you think everyone should stop buying fast fashion?

Not if you cannot afford it. Fast fashion, such as Primark, is cheap and cheerful and often the only option for struggling families. There’s also an amazing convenience paired with fast fashion. For parents it’s easier to just get the specific item from a shop. Charity shops are a bit hit and miss, and they require more time to shop. So if you have a lot to juggle around, it simply isn’t possible. If clothes can be manufactured in better ways, perhaps I would buy fast fashion. However my main concern is the sheer amount of waste. If you cannot afford thrifting/sustainable shopping please do not feel inferior. Don’t feel any pressure from me to buy clothes in a certain way. Do what is best for YOU!

Hope you found this post useful and informative. Let me know in the comments if you’d like to be involved in The Plastic Plan series, or if you have any other requests for sustainable fashion related content. 

What are your plans for the weekend?

Guess who’s birthday is next week? Hopefully I’ll make a monster sized cake to share with you either on here or Instagram haha. I’d love to know what you’re up to this weekend!

catherine x

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The Misuse Of Water & How To Prevent It | Guest Post By Millie Button

Water, water, water. Fundamental for our survival yet used so carelessly. Water, water, water. Everyday we use this precious resource without even knowing it. How long is it going to take for people to realise that everything we do has an impact?

How many people in India don’t have access to clean water? Go on, have a guess! 100 million. 100 million people who don’t have access to the stuff we have so easily. Another statistic? Sure! 20,000 litres of water is used to produce 1 kilogram of cotton. So, it won’t come as a shock to you when I say that the fashion industry is one of the most water-using industries across the globe.

Fast fashion. We’ve all heard of it and most of us shop it. The fast fashion industry is really the culprit for the large amounts of water used by the fashion industry. The industrial-sized dyeing processes, the mass scale production using inorganic fibres, the list just goes on. Water, water, water, when will we stop taking it for granted? Let us not pretend that the problem lies just with these fashion brands, it is also the product of consumerism.

Scary word right? It makes your everyday Topshop or Primark shopper be turned into a monster before your very eyes. We’re all consumers and that isn’t going to change. But, there are ways to be a mindful consumer and stop using that precious jewel known as water. Thrifting. I know, certainly for me, buying from charity shops was always looked down on as something that was done by people who couldn’t afford normal clothes. Yet, this trend of sustainability has brought new life into these shops and created a new approach. Buying second-hand clothes means not using more water for new garments.

Try bringing a new lease of life into your clothes! Thrift-flip your old clothes! Or even try to buy slow fashion. This gets very expensive quickly, but that means a balance between the two. If you are going to buy fast fashion, do it as an investment and cut down on other pieces.

Water, water, water. We need it more than you would know, so save it and treasure it. Water, water, water…

Thank you for reading today’s post, written by the wonderful Millie! Millie is a small content creator who regularly posts on her blog, Instagram and YouTube channel. Her blog is focused around fashion design, and through her platforms she is actively spreading the word about fast fashion and why it should end. Her profiles are inspiring and informative – the perfect blend for success. Please support her journey by clicking here! I would like to personally thank Millie for writing on my blog because you are such a huge inspiration for me!

Next week’s post is all about bath bombs and their danger to our planet. Stay tuned!

Do you buy second-hand clothes? How are you going to stop investing in fast fashion, taking inspiration from this post?

catherine x

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5 Ways To Save The Planet This Christmas

Christmas is the most wasteful season in the year but making a small change will make a huge difference. Listed in this post are some good habits that you can try to implement. They will help to reduce your waste in this time of climate crisis but they also won’t be noticeable in your day-to-day life!

  • Use brown paper to wrap your presents

The commercial wrapping paper is made from non-recyclable materials such as plastic among other things. It is really hard to recycle and often goes straight to landfill. To avoid this you can use brown paper! I much prefer the aesthetic of brown paper anyways because it adds a rustic effect and it can be personalised! You can draw and decorate it if you have time (which congratulations if you do)

  • Carefully unwrap presents so that you can reuse the wrapping paper

If the brown paper doesn’t work for you (I know that as a child I wouldn’t be best pleased with plain brown!) then you can always reuse paper from previous years. Our family has a small stash of wrapping paper that has already been used once.

  • Don’t send cards with glitter on them

I didn’t realise how many cards have glitter on them! If you put into action any of these tips then please make it this one. Glitter is non-biodegradable which means that the whole card won’t be able to be recycled. At the rate trees are being cut down it’s essential that we decrease the demand for paper buy recycling what we already have!

  • Don’t send cards to people you barely know

Linking to the previous advice – don’t send cards to people you barely know! If I was to receive a card from my great-uncle’s girlfriend’s son I wouldn’t really care about it. Only send cards to people you know and if they are close family then make it! It’s so special to receive a card that you know someone had spent time making. No big, fancy card can beat it!

  • Shop locally/at independent stores

Knowing where your presents come from adds a reassurance that you don’t get when you buy at retail parks. Supporting your local economy is a really important investment and will return is different forms such better public services and more books in the library!

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It’s really important to reduce waste at Christmas but the season is already stressful enough. I hope that these tips are easily achievable and don’t add any weight on your shoulders! Sometimes I can sit down and feel peaceful though throughout most of the week it’s a rush of school, theatre, blogging, social events, cooking, cleaning and the anticipation of the weekend. There is clarity but there isn’t much relaxation!

How are you going to spend Christmas? Do you find that the effort you go to pre-Christmas is ever rewarded?

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